FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Glossary

Question
·  Authenticated Dyamic
·  Cache
·  DMZ
·  DNS
·  Dynamic IP address
·  ESMTP
·  ETRN
·  FTP
·  IETF
·  HTML
·  PHP
·  POP3
·  Outsourcing
·  SMTP
·  SNMP
·  SPAM
·  TCP/IP
·  WebDAV
·  IMAP4
·  Path MTU Discovery

Answer
·  Authenticated Dyamic

An ETRN.com, Inc. developed method of authenticating a customer's mail server. This allows a customer that obtains a dynamic IP address from their ISP to use our E-Mail Spooling Service

Top


·  Cache

In computer engineering, a cache is a component that transparently stores data so that future requests for that data can be served faster. The data that is stored within a cache might be values that have been computed earlier or duplicates of original values that are stored elsewhere. If requested data is contained in the cache (cache hit), this request can be served by simply reading the cache, which is comparatively faster. Otherwise (cache miss), the data has to be recomputed or fetched from its original storage location, which is comparatively slower. Hence, the more requests can be served from the cache the faster the overall system performance is. A more in depth description of a cache is available here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cache

Top


·  DMZ

DMZ stands for DeMilitarized Zone. A DMZ is your frontline when protecting valuable assets from direct exposure to an untrusted environment (like the Internet). A DMZ adds an extra layer of defense to your systems. A more in depth description of a DMZ is available here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DMZ_(computing)

Top


·  DNS

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a distributed Internet directory service. DNS is used primarily to translate between domain names and IP addresses, and to control Internet e-mail delivery. A domain name is a meaningful and easy-to-remember "handle" for an Internet address.

Top


·  Dynamic IP address

Most ISPs assign their customers a dynamic IP address. This means the customer´s equipment will most likely be assigned a different IP address each time a connection is established.

Top


·  ESMTP

An extension to the SMTP service which defines a means whereby a SMTP server can inform a SMTP client as to the service extensions it supports. The details of ESMTP are in RFC 1869.

Top


·  ETRN

"Extended TURN" An ESMTP command (first defined in RFC 1985) with which a client asks the server to deliver queued mail to the client via a new ESMTP connection.

Top


·  FTP

A communications protocol governing the transfer of files from one computer to another over a network. FTP is commonly used for publish web pages to a web server. FTP is defined in RFC 959.

Top


·  IETF

(Internet Engineering Task Force). The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the body that defines standard Internet operating protocols such as TCP/IP.

Top


·  HTML

HyperText Markup Language - A markup language used to structure text and multimedia documents and to set up hypertext links between documents, used extensively on the World Wide Web. More information about HTML is available on the W3C web site.

Top


·  PHP

A server-side, cross-platform, widely-used general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for Web development and can be embedded into HTML. More information is available on the PHP web site.

Top


·  POP3

Version 3 of the Post Office Protocol. POP3 is defined in RFC 1081, written in November 1988 by Marshall Rose, which is based on RFC 918 (since revised as RFC 937). POP3 allows a client computer to retrieve electronic mail from a POP3 server via a (temporary) TCP/IP connection. It does not provide for sending mail, which is assumed to be done via SMTP or some other method.

Top


·  Outsourcing

The strategic use of outside resources to perform activities traditionally handled by internal staff and resources. This is a management strategy by which an organization contracts out functions to specialized service providers. An example of outsourcing is our E-Mail Hosting Service.

Top


·  SMTP

(Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) SMTP is a TCP/IP protocol governing electronic mail transmission and reception. The details of SMTP are in RFC 821 of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

Top


·  SNMP

The protocol governing network management and the monitoring of network devices and their functions. It is not necessarily limited to TCP/IP networks. The details of SNMP are in RFC 1157 of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

Top


·  SPAM

Unsolicited e-mail, often of a commercial nature, sent indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups; junk e-mail.

Top


·  TCP/IP

(Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) TCP/IP is the basic communication language or protocol of the Internet.

Top


·  WebDAV

"Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning". WebDAV is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol which allows users to collaboratively edit and manage files on remote web servers. WebDAV is defined in RFC 2518. More information about WebDAV is available on the WebDAV Resources web site.

Top


·  IMAP4

Internet Message Access Protocol, Version 4rev1 (IMAP4rev1). IMAP4rev1 is defined in RFC 2060. IMAP4 allows a client to access and manipulate electronic mail messages on a server. IMAP4rev1 permits manipulation of remote message folders, called "mailboxes", in a way that is functionally equivalent to local mailboxes.

Top


·  Path MTU Discovery

Path MTU Discovery is a technique for dynamically discovering the maximum transmission unit (MTU) of an arbitrary internet path. The details of path MTU discovery are in RFC 1191

Top


We Answer Your Questions: FAQ

Q: What is the maximum e-mail attachment size?

A: The ETRN.com e-mail servers do not limit the size of individual e-mail attachments. The ETRN.com e-mail servers do impose a 400 MB maximum total message size limit. Individual customers can choose a smaller message size limit. We can also customize the handling of "over-sized" e-mails. Please contact us to discuss your specific needs. A couple of important facts:

1. Attachments are typically encoded in what is called Base64[1]. As a result, the actual length of MIME-compliant Base64-encoded binary data is usually about 137% of the original file size.

2. E-mails often contain both plain text and HTML components. This also increases the overall size of the e-mail.