FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Service Department's blog

Late Monday, April 7, 2014, the OpenSSL project, the popular open source cryptographic library, released an update to address a serious security vulnerability nicknamed "Heartbleed".

Microsoft has warned computer users that malicious hackers are exploiting a previously unknown vulnerability in Microsoft Word, in order to infect computers with malware.

We are currently investigating an outage to our chi1.etrn.com data center.  Updates to follow as more information becomes available.

Updates:


As of 11:18 AM CST all services have been restored and queued e-mails are being processed.

Microsoft has identified a “zero-day” vulnerability involving .TIFF files. This means that neither Microsoft nor the antivirus companies have been able to develop tools to address this vulnerability. Because this is a zero-day vulnerability, the only way to protect yourself is to exercise extreme caution when opening .TIFF files, no matter how they reach you—whether via e-mail, web sites, or any other means.  ETRN advises all its users to be very careful with .TIFF files.  Anti-virus and firewall protection applications may not stop this threat. Do not open any files with a filename ending in .tiff.

We Answer Your Questions: FAQ

Q: What is the maximum e-mail attachment size?

A: The ETRN.com e-mail servers do not limit the size of individual e-mail attachments. The ETRN.com e-mail servers do impose a 400 MB maximum total message size limit. Individual customers can choose a smaller message size limit. We can also customize the handling of "over-sized" e-mails. Please contact us to discuss your specific needs. A couple of important facts:

1. Attachments are typically encoded in what is called Base64[1]. As a result, the actual length of MIME-compliant Base64-encoded binary data is usually about 137% of the original file size.

2. E-mails often contain both plain text and HTML components. This also increases the overall size of the e-mail.